Building a movement led by everyday people to create change in their communities and across the country.

We envision a nationwide social movement led by everyday people and inspired by the conviction that we can create a society in which everyone has enough to thrive and achieve their full potential. Learn More >>

Our Work

Only social movements can create social change.

The Center’s mission is to build the power and capacity of low-income people, especially low-income people of color, to change their communities and public policies for the better.
   
History: In 2012, the Center for Community Change marked the 45th anniversary of its founding.
People: We are from red states and blue; we are both youthful and seasoned; and we represent the rich diversity of America’s immigrants, recent and from decades past, as well as its native population. Together, we work with vigor and vision to end poverty and exclusion in America.
Movement Building: View all of our campaigns.
CCCAction is our sister organization. Visit our site to know more information.

Connect

Connect

We unite groups in coalition and collaborate on common goals.

Organize

Organize

We elevate collaborative work for national impact.

Build

Build

We provide resources that let grassroots groups do more.

Amplify

Amplify

We train people to advocate for themselves.

180
180 Grassroots Ambassadors. CCC trains these “super volunteers” to be leaders and storytellers with the skills to organize others, the creativity to drive strategy, and the resilience to build movements.
17
With campaigns in 17 states, we fight to defend the anti-poverty programs that keep tens of millions of Americans fed and healthy.
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90 Pieces by our Writing Fellows. CCC creates a platform for writers who come from low-income backgrounds and speak from their own experiences with poverty, inequality, and the struggle to make ends meet. Publications from the Washington Post to The Undefeated to CNN featured them in 2016.

Focus Areas

Fifteen years ago, grassroots groups gearing up to change welfare reform realized that economic justice could not be won without wage equality and worker protections for undocumented immigrants. The new millennium saw an increase in vitriol directed against immigrants, who often were blamed for the fact that – whether the economy was up or down – for most people, the opportunity for a solid middle-class life continued to recede. Learn More >>  

The Latest

Senate health care bill would pull the lifeline of the chronically ill

Jamison Hill hasn’t been able to get out of bed in two and a half years. For 18 months, Jamison was too sick to tolerate clothing, eating, daylight, or too much movement or sound. When I met with him last fall, he sat up with the help of pillows and could tolerate limited amounts of light. We took a few pictures together, momentarily lighting the room with the flash.

Make Your Voice Heard. Go Vote In Tuesday’s Local Elections.

This article previously appeared on The Huffington Post During the 2016 election cycle, I frequently heard people complaining about the impossibility of escaping the daily barrage of news and coverage regarding…

Messaging This Moment: A Handbook for Progressive Communicators

We hope you find these materials inspiring and helpful, and we look forward to partnering with each and every one of you as we work together to bend the arc of history back toward justice.

A Hurricane Is Never An Excuse To Mock The Poor

No hurricane should be an opportunity to mock the poor. It is a sad moment when the President of the United States blatantly engages in poverty shaming, cynically directed against people of color.

Double Standard, Double Spacing

Late in April, approximately 1,000 students in the Upward Bound Program at The University of Maine Presque Isle (UMPI) received notice that their funds would not be continued, due to the line spacing of their funding application.

IN: Race

Investor deposits lessons in financial literacy, freedom for a new generation

This article first appeared on MLK50: Justice Through Journalism. Floyd Tyler grew up in the Orange Mound community near Lamar and Pendleton with five pairs of pants and five shirts in…

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